September 2014

On August 30th I saw the first deer I have seen in the school forest since early spring. Two does stood watching as my grandson and I walked up the trail. They seemed unafraid and only moved away when we angled quite close to them. I have mostly walked the school forest trails lately, mostly because I am walking my little dog and she prefers to walk trails she has walked before. Deer seem to abandon the school forest area in the summer. Perhaps there is just too much vegetation on field edges, just too much cover outside the woods. But as fall approaches, the deer will change their patterns and in a month or two, they will be commonly seen, not only in the school forest, but more so in the Scotch Creek Preserve.

The dampness of the woods lately, with rainfall every few days, has produced a plentiful variety of mushrooms in the woods. My grandson is quite expert on identifying mushrooms and the varieties he pointed out made for a real learning experience. I am familiar with puffballs. They are probably the easiest to correctly identify as an edible mushroom. Morels are easy to identify as well, but they are present only in spring. Here’s some of the lesson I listened to–” See those fungi on that maple tree? They are edible. See this mushroom. It doesn’t have gills under its cap. It isn’t a bolete mushroom either, they have pores under the cap, this has like little teeth extending down from the cap. It is good to eat. See these on this log. They are called turkey tails. People don’t eat them because of their texture. See these? They are called Indian pipes. See this? It’s a type of amanita. It’s poisonous.” I looked at the white mushroom called the “death angel.” After my grandson gave details on ten or fifteen varieties of various fungi, I came to the conclusion that really learning about mushrooms would take more time than I care to spend. I’ll stick to looking for morels in spring, and maybe picking and eating a few puffballs now and then. The last thing my grandson mentioned was that he could hardly wait until after the first frost. When I asked him why, he said that boletus edulis, a type of tube fungi, or bolete, is one of the tastiest mushrooms you can find and though it occurs in August and September, usually it is worm ridden shortly after appearing. The frost must be the reason that later boletes are more worm free. They grow under coniferous trees so there are many places in the preserve that they may occur. I’ll leave most edible mushrooms to the experts, but I will never look at a damp, fungi laden woods again in the same way. Enjoy our trails!  Much to see.

August 2014

August is one of the months that sees little change in the woodlands of the Scotch Creek Preserve. Unlike the rapid changes from week to week in spring and fall, the months of July and August seem quite alike in the woods. There are, however, some happenings if you pay attention. Summer plants are now reaching maturity and this is most evident in what is happening to the raspberries. These plants, mostly along the old railroad right of way on the south end of the preserve and north of the trees on the north side of the preserve have just about ended their fruiting. Some of the berries have been picked by people, me included, but when I found a large patch of raspberry brush, a somewhat circular thirty foot diameter area crushed quite flat with relatively few berries on the plants, I could only think that a bear had done some berry picking also. There are a number of animals that will feast on berries. Fox and raccoon come to mind, but they are not the culprit in this case. Milkweed pods are formed and if you wonder why some of them have been depleted of a lot of the fluff, perhaps you can blame the goldfinches. They nest somewhat later than most other birds and they line their nests with fine fibers like thistledown and milkweed fluff. I have seen several goldfinch nests found in the fall and those little finches must have appreciated a most comfortable “crib.” Many of the flowering meadow plants are beautiful right now. If you walk the trails on the north side of the school forest you will notice hickory nuts on the trails now. These are nuts from the bitternut hickory and there are a number of hickory trees in these woods. The squirrels are already harvesting hickory nuts. Walk the trails. Enjoy! Revised 8/9/14

July 2014

During the summer months I do not walk the trails as often as I do during spring and fall. It is not because there are mosquitoes and deer flies at times in the summer, instead it is because during the summer I find myself busy with garden and yard. My walks in the woods hold different attractions now. Today I walked through the school forest area and east into the Scotch Creek Preserve itself. The only color in the woods, it seems, other than the various greens and browns of the leaves and tree trunks, was the splash of red from the berries of the red elder bushes. Just a month age the red elder bushes were covered with bunches of white blossoms. Now the BB size berries are attracting robins. Unlike the dark, purplish berries of the elderberry of wine and pie fame, the red berries of the red elder probably aren’t on anyone’s menu, unless you are a robin. Red elders are shade plants and usually are located under trees in shaded areas. The American Elder producing the late summer and early fall berries some of us love is usually found in sunnier locations at the edge of woods, on wet, even swampy ground. They are in blossom right now-some along the old railroad path on the south side of the preserve.Take a walk in the preserve this summer. Enjoy the woods! Updated 7/21/14

 

June 2014

The Preserve in June is very different from the woods of May. Unlike May, when visibility was great, now ferns are of full height, young trees (mostly maples) are abundant and it is difficult to see any distance through the woods. It is not fly time yet, but a few mosquitoes accompany the walker now unless one times the walk for the cool early morning or a windy day. There is still plenty to see. Although some undoubtedly have passed through on the way north, an abundance of birds are to be seen in the Preserve. At the end of May, in two hours, photographer and bird expert, Lori, identified 32 types of birds and took pictures of many of them. Most visitors to the Preserve can identify birds such as the Baltimore Oriole, Black-capped Chickadee, Red Winged Blackbird and other common types, but here are some of the lesser known birds identified–Clay-colored Sparrow, Blackpoll Warbler, Nashville Warbler, American Redstart, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Green Heron, Northern Rough-winged Swallow, Least Flycatcher, Tree Swallow, Ovenbird, Indigo Bunting, Magnolia Warbler, Gray Catbird, Song Sparrow, Yellow Warbler, Chipping Sparrow, Swainson’s Thrush, Savannah Sparrow, Alder Flycatcher, Scarlet Tanager, Palm Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, and Downy Woodpecker. Not seen during that two hour walk, but often observed in the Preserve are Pileated Woodpeckers, various hawks and owls, and other types of songbirds. Bring binoculars and a camera. You may get some pictures of uncommon and beautiful birds.

May 2014

A walk in the woods of the Preserve shows us that spring is arriving. Let’s take a walk through part of the Scotch Creek Preserve as seen by Kris (our flower and plant expert member) during a walk with her lady friend on May 6th. Walking down the abandoned rail bed on the south end of the preserve they saw that Wild Ginger has emerged. Marsh Marigolds along the rail bed are almost in bloom. Blooming plants in the woods include Dutchman’s Breeches, Mayflower and Bloodroot. Plants that are emerging but not flowering yet include Ramps (wild leek), Trout Lily, Spring Beauty, Northern Blue Flag Iris, and Virginia Waterleaf.  Ferns are coming up, gooseberry bushes are leafed out, the red-berried elders have flower buds, and pussy willows are at their fuzziest. It’s a great time to be in the woods looking at all the flowers and other plants.  A bonus–on their walk, they saw three deer and their first snapping turtle of the year. Enjoy the trails!

Update-5/14/14 Trout lilies now blooming. Trilliums are beginning their blooming. Another snapping turtle seen and Kris and Carolyn saw 14 deer in one walk through the south end of the preserve. Some people are awaiting the arrival of mushroom gathering time. No mosquitoes or flies yet. A perfect time to enjoy the woods!